<TED Worksheet (Free)>
63. What is déjà vu? What is déjà vu?
Michael Molina
<3:40>   August 2013

 

Questions
(PDF)   (Word)

Answers
(PDF)   (Word)

Trascript

<Key Vocabulary>
Write the meaning(s) of each word. Write an example sentence (example sentences) if you need.

(1) choreograph

(2) manifestation

(3) surplus

(4) speculation

(5) neuroimaging

(6) prevalent

(7) zip (through)

(8) flail

(9) hologram

(10) summon

(11) recollect

(12) subliminally

(13) peripheral

(14) fleet

(15) first-hand (account)





================
<Questions>

  1. Why is it difficult for scientists to record and study déjà vu?

 

 

  1. What does the French term “déjà vu” mean in English?

 

 

  1. Today, there are three prevalent theories of déjà vu. Fill in the blanks.

Theory 1:  (1)               processing

(e.g.) A waiter is dropping a tray of dishes.

  • Your (2)                hemispheres

      process a flurry of information.

(i.e.) the waiter’s flailing arms, his cry for

         help, the smell of pasta

  • Within milliseconds, this information

      zip through pathways and is

      processed in a

      (3)                    moment.

      → Déjà vu happens when there

            is a slight (4)                         in

            information from one of these

            pathways.

  • The difference in arrival times

       causes the brain to interpret

       the late information as a

       (5)                                 event.

  • When it plays over the

       already-recorded moment,

       it feels as if it’s happened before.




  Theory 2:  (6)                      theory

 (e.g.) a tablecloth

  • When you scan its squares,

       a distant memory swims up

       from deep within your brain.

       (According to the theory,

        (7)                are stored in the

       form of holograms, and in

       holograms, you only need

       one fragment to see the

       whole picture.)

  • Your brain identifies the tablecloth

      with one from the past, but it

      summons up the old memory

      without (8)                           it.

      → This leaves you stuck

            with familiarity, but no

           (9)                                      .

           (You will fail to identify

           where you have seen it.)




  Theory 3:  (10)                  attention

  • According to this theory,

     déjà vu happens when our brain

    (11)                    takes in an

    environment while we’re distracted

    by one particular object.

     → When our attention returns, we

           feel as if we’ve been here before.

         (e.g.) a tablecloth, a fork,

                  and a falling waiter

  • Just focus on the fork.

      (Don’t pay attention to the

       tablecloth or the waiter.)

  • Your brain has been recording

      everything in your

      (12)                        vision,

      but it has been doing so below

      conscious awareness. 

  • When you finally pull yourself

       away from the fork, you think

       you have been here before.

       (You have, but you just were

       not paying attention.) 

 

  1. Which of the following statements is true?
  1. Most déjà vu can be explained by one of the three theories introduced in the speech.
  2. Most studies of déjà vu are based on first-hand accounts.
  3. It is impossible to study déjà vu unless you are a professional researcher.
  4. Everybody has experienced déjà vu before.




================
<Answers>

  1. Why is it difficult for scientists to record and study déjà vu?

Because it is brief and occurs without notice. (There is not hard evidence.)

 

  1. What does the French term “déjà vu” mean in English?

already seen

 

  1. Today, there are three prevalent theories of déjà vu. Fill in the blanks.

Theory 1:  (1)  dual    processing

(e.g.) A waiter is dropping a tray of dishes.

  • Your (2)  brain    hemispheres

      process a flurry of information.

(i.e.) the waiter’s flailing arms, his cry for

         help, the smell of pasta

  • Within milliseconds, this information

      zip through pathways and is

      processed in a

      (3)  single     moment.

      → Déjà vu happens when there

            is a slight (4)   delay    in

            information from one of these

            pathways.

  • The difference in arrival times

       causes the brain to interpret

       the late information as a

       (5)   separate    event.

  • When it plays over the

       already-recorded moment,

       it feels as if it’s happened before.




  Theory 2:  (6)   hologram   theory

 (e.g.) a tablecloth

  • When you scan its squares,

       a distant memory swims up

       from deep within your brain.

       (According to the theory,

        (7)  memories    are stored in the

       form of holograms, and in

       holograms, you only need

       one fragment to see the

       whole picture.)

  • Your brain identifies the tablecloth

      with one from the past, but it

      summons up the old memory

      without (8)   identifying    it.

      → This leaves you stuck

            with familiarity, but no

           (9)   recollection     .

           (You will fail to identify

           where you have seen it.)




  Theory 3:  (10)  divided    attention

  • According to this theory,

     déjà vu happens when our brain

    (11)   subliminally   takes in an

    environment while we’re distracted

    by one particular object.

     → When our attention returns, we

           feel as if we’ve been here before.

         (e.g.) a tablecloth, a fork,

                  and a falling waiter

  • Just focus on the fork.

      (Don’t pay attention to the

       tablecloth or the waiter.)

  • Your brain has been recording

      everything in your

      (12)  peripheral    vision,

      but it has been doing so below

      conscious awareness. 

  • When you finally pull yourself

       away from the fork, you think

       you have been here before.

       (You have, but you just were

       not paying attention.) 

 

  1. Which of the following statements is true?
  1. Most déjà vu can be explained by one of the three theories introduced in the speech.
  2. Most studies of déjà vu are based on first-hand accounts.
  3. It is impossible to study déjà vu unless you are a professional researcher.
  4. Everybody has experienced déjà vu before.

 

========================

Click here for more TED Talks Worksheets!

========================