<TED Worksheet (Free)>
64. Why are earthquakes so hard to predict?
Gareth Gaskell
<4:21>   July 2020

 

Questions
(PDF)   (Word)

Answers
(PDF)   (Word)

Trascript

<Key Vocabulary>
Write the meaning(s) of each word. Write an example sentence (example sentences) if you need.

(1) polymath

(2) seismic

(3) polymath

(4) skeptical

(5) seemingly

(6) gratitude

(7) jagged

(8) slab

(9) mantle

(10) minuscule

(11) juxtapose

(12) friction

(13) lubricate

(14) cyclical

(15) overdue

(16) imminent

(17) rigorous

(18) radioactive




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<Questions>

  1. In 132 CE, Zhang Heng, a Chinese polymath, invented a special vase. According to Heng, what was special about it?

 

 

 

  1. What are tectonic plates?

 

 

  1. Tectonic plates spread very slowly because they are riding on a layer of the Earth’s mantle, and the movements cause deep cracks and earthquakes. How fast are the plates moving?

   

 




  1. Write “T” if the statement is true and “F” if the statement is false.
  1. There are many factors that cause seismic events.           
  2. Some rocks are partially melted, and that will increase fault line friction.          
  3. Some rocks are dry, and they are usually safer because they can release pressure.        
  4. Diverse rocks react differently to friction and high temperatures.            

 

 

  1. In order to predict earthquakes, we obtain reliable clues from
  1. long-term forecasting related to when and where earthquakes have previously occurred.
  2. pots like those Zhang Heng invented.
  3. analyzing highly active faults, like San Andreas.
  4. researching the Earth’s mantle.

 

  1. Although our smartphones might not be able to provide the advance notice needed to enact safety protocols, the data is useful. Why?

 

 

  1. Right before the Great East Japan Earthquake happened, nearby researchers
  1. discovered highly active faults in the Korean Peninsula.
  2. detected fluids made of superheated minerals.
  3. recorded high concentrations of the radioactive isotope pair: radon and thoron.  
  4. were looking deep inside the earth.




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<Answers>

  1. In 132 CE, Zhang Heng, a Chinese polymath, invented a special vase. According to Heng, what was special about it?

It could tell whenever an earthquake occurred in their kingdom, including the direction in which they should send aid.

 

 

  1. What are tectonic plates?

They are vast and jagged slabs of rock that make the Earth’s crust.

 

  1. Tectonic plates spread very slowly because they are riding on a layer of the Earth’s mantle, and the movements cause deep cracks and earthquakes. How fast are the plates moving?

 1 to 20 centimeters per year

 




  1. Write “T” if the statement is true and “F” if the statement is false.
  1. There are many factors that cause seismic events.      T  
  2. Some rocks are partially melted, and that will increase fault line friction.      F    
  3. Some rocks are dry, and they are usually safer because they can release pressure.    F   
  4. Diverse rocks react differently to friction and high temperatures.       T     

 

  1. In order to predict earthquakes, we obtain reliable clues from
  1. long-term forecasting related to when and where earthquakes have previously occurred.
  2. pots like those Zhang Heng invented.
  3. analyzing highly active faults, like San Andreas.
  4. researching the Earth’s mantle.

 

  1. Although our smartphones might not be able to provide the advance notice needed to enact safety protocols, the data is useful. Why?

 Because prediction tools, like NASA’s Quakesim software, can use it to identify regions at risk.

 

  1. Right before the Great East Japan Earthquake happened, nearby researchers
  1. discovered highly active faults in the Korean Peninsula.
  2. detected fluids made of superheated minerals.
  3. recorded high concentrations of the radioactive isotope pair: radon and thoron.  
  4. were looking deep inside the earth.

 

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