<TED Worksheet (Free)>
73.Will there ever be a mile-high skyscraper?
Stefan Al
 
<4:44> February 2019

 

 

Questions
PDF)(Word

Answers
PDF)(Word

Trascript

<Key Vocabulary>
Write the meaning(s) of each word. Write an example sentence (example sentences) if you need.

(1) propose
(2) skyscraper
(3) architect
(4) collapse
(5) publicity
(6) megastructure
(7) gravitational
(8) foundation
(9) impractical
(10) reinforce
(11) fiber
(12) polymer
(13) withstand
(14) foundation
(15) prevent
(16) overcome
(17) aerodynamic
(18) absorb
(19) orb
(20) sway
(21) kinetic
(22) hydraulic
(23) convert





<Questions> 

  1. In 1956, what did Frank Lloyd Wright, an architect, propose?

 

  1. Which of the following statements is not true?
  1. Jeddah Tower in Saudi Arabia will be three times the size of the Eiffel Tower.
  2. Building a mile-high skyscraper will be impossible even in the future.
  3. Many firms are planning to build skyscrapers more than a kilometer tall.
  4. At the time, most engineers agreed that there were some problems in Frank Lloyd Wright’s proposal.

 

  1. The following section describes some problems that we need to overcome to build mile high buildings. Fill in the blanks.
  1. Problem 1: Each story of the structure needs to be able to (1)                        the stories on top of it.
    • The higher we build, the higher the (2)                           pressure from the upper stories on the lower ones.
      (e.g.) Pyramids have wide foundations that support lighter upper levels.
    1. → Building a mile high pyramid would be roughly
      1. (3)                                miles wide, so it won’t squeeze into a city center.
    • Fortunately, strong materials like (4)                        can avoid this problem.
    1. → Modern concrete blends are reinforced with (5)                                (2 words) for strength and water-reducing polymers to prevent (6)                        .
    2. → The concrete in the world’s tallest tower, Dubai’s Burj Khalifa, can withstand about (7)                        tons of pressure per square meter.
    • Building still need support from the ground.
    1. →Without a foundation, buildings this heavy would (8)                        , (9)                        , or lean over .
    2. → To prevent the roughly half a million ton tower from sinking, 
      (10)                        concrete and steel supports called piles were buried over (11)                        meter deep. (The (12)                        between the piles and the ground keeps the structure standing.)
    3.  




 

  1. Problem 2: A skyscraper also needs to overcome the (13)                                        (2 words).
    • On average days, wind can exert up to (14)                        pounds of force per square meter.
    • Designing structures to be aerodynamic, like China’s sleek Shanghai Tower, can reduce that force by up to a (15)                             .
    • Like Seoul’s Lotte Tower, wind-bearing frames inside or outside the building can (16)                        the remaining wind force.
    • To prevent the wind from rocking tower tops, many skyscrapers employ a counterweight weighing hundreds of tons called a “tuned mass (17)                        .”
      (e.g.) The Taipei 101 has suspended a giant metal orb above the 87 th floor
    1. → When wind moves the building, the orb sways into action, absorbing the
      building’s kinetic energy.
  2. Problem 3: The speed of elevators.
    • In Wright’s age, elevators could travel as fast as (18)                 km/h.
    • But today, elevators can travel over (19)                 km/h.
  3.  





<Answers>

  1. In 1956, what did Frank Lloyd Wright, an architect, propose?

building a mile-high skyscraper

  1. Which of the following statements is not true?
  1. Jeddah Tower in Saudi Arabia will be three times the size of the Eiffel Tower.
  2. Building a mile-high skyscraper will be impossible even in the future.
  3. Many firms are planning to build skyscrapers more than a kilometer tall.
  4. At the time, most engineers agreed that there were some problems in Frank Lloyd Wright’s proposal.

 

  1. The following section describes some problems that we need to overcome to build mile high buildings. Fill in the blanks.
  1. Problem 1: Each story of the structure needs to be able to (1)  support   the stories on top of it.
    • The higher we build, the higher the (2)  gravitational   pressure from the upper stories on the lower ones.
      (e.g.) Pyramids have wide foundations that support lighter upper levels.
    1. → Building a mile high pyramid would be roughly
      1. (3)  one-and-a-half (1.5)   miles wide, so it won’t squeeze into a city center.
    • Fortunately, strong materials like (4)  concrete    can avoid this problem.
    1. → Modern concrete blends are reinforced with (5)  steel-fibers   (2 words) for strength and water-reducing polymers to prevent (6)  cracking    .
    2. → The concrete in the world’s tallest tower, Dubai’s Burj Khalifa, can withstand about (7)  8,000    tons of pressure per square meter.
    • Building still need support from the ground.
    1. →Without a foundation, buildings this heavy would (8)  sink    , (9)  fall    , or lean over .
    2. → To prevent the roughly half a million ton tower from sinking, 
      (10)  192   concrete and steel supports called piles were buried over (11)  50     meter deep. (The (12)  friction    between the piles and the ground keeps the structure standing.)
    3.  




  1. Problem 2: A skyscraper also needs to overcome the (13)  blowing wind    (2 words).
    • On average days, wind can exert up to (14)  17   pounds of force per square meter.
    • Designing structures to be aerodynamic, like China’s sleek Shanghai Tower, can reduce that force by up to a (15)  quarter (1/4)   .
    • Like Seoul’s Lotte Tower, wind-bearing frames inside or outside the building can (16)  absorb    the remaining wind force.
    • To prevent the wind from rocking tower tops, many skyscrapers employ a counterweight weighing hundreds of tons called a “tuned mass (17)  damper   .”
      (e.g.) The Taipei 101 has suspended a giant metal orb above the 87 th floor
    1. → When wind moves the building, the orb sways into action, absorbing the
      building’s kinetic energy.
  2. Problem 3: The speed of elevators.
    • In Wright’s age, elevators could travel as fast as (18)   22    km/h.
    • But today, elevators can travel over (19)   70    km/h.

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