<TED Worksheet>
14. The language of lying
Noah Zandan
<5:26>  November 2014

 

Questions
(PDF)   (Word)

Answers
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Trascript

 

≪Questions:The language of lying≫
1. From how many to how many lies do we hear a day?

 

2. Although we have developed many lie detectors, such as voice-stress analyzers and eye trackers, they are not reliable enough to be admissible in court. Why?  

 

3. Instead of using technology, what does the speaker suggests using to analyze lies?

 

4. Fill in the blanks.

On a psychological level, we lie partly to (1)                    a better picture of 

(2)                     . But while our brain is busy dreaming,

it’s letting plenty of signals slip by. 

Our conscious mind only controls about (3)           % of our cognitive function, 

including communication, while the other (4)            % occurs beyond our awareness.




5. There are four common patters in the subconscious language of deception. What are they? Fill in the blanks.

<I. Liars reference themselves (1)                  , when making deceptive statements.>

They write or talk more about (2)                 ,

often using the third person to distance and

disassociate themselves from their (3)                .

<e.g.> “Absolutely no party took place at this house.”    “I didn’t host a party here.”

 

<II. Liars tend to be more (4)                 >

Because on a subconscious level,

they feel (5)                  about lying.

<e.g.> “Sorry, my stupid phone battery died. I hate that thing.”

 

<III. Liars tend to explain events in (6)                     .>

Our brains struggle to build a complex lie.

(7)                 and (8)                   are complex things for our brains to compute.

<e.g.> “I did not have sexual relations with that woman.”

 

<IV. Liars tend to use (9)                   and more convoluted sentence structure.>

Insert (10)                  words and irrelevant but factual sounding details in order to pad the lie.

<e.g.> “I can say, categorically, that this investigation indicates that no one on the White House staff, no one in this administration presently employed was involved in this very bizarre incident.”




6. In this speech, the speaker compares two interviews with Lance Armstrong, conducted in 2005 and 2013. How are they different?

 

7. At the end of the speech, the speaker mentions that we do not have to be extremely sensitive about lies we encounter on a daily basis. Why?

 




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≪Answers:The laguage of lying≫

1. From how many to how many lies do we hear a day?
from 10 to 200 

 

2. Although we have developed many lie detectors, such as voice-stress analyzers and eye trackers, they are not reliable enough to be admissible in court. Why?  
Because most of them can be fooled with enough preparation.

 





3. Instead of using technology, what does the speaker suggests using to analyze lies?
communication science

 

4. Fill in the blanks.

On a psychological level, we lie partly to (1)      paint         a better picture of 

(2)     ourselves        . But while our brain is busy dreaming,

it’s letting plenty of signals slip by. 

Our conscious mind only controls about (3)     5      % of our cognitive function, 

including communication, while the other (4)__95__% occurs beyond our awareness.

 

 

5. There are four common patters in the subconscious language of deception. What are they? Fill in the blanks.

<I. Liars reference themselves (1)    less      , when making deceptive statements.>

They write or talk more about (2) _   others      , often using the third person to distance and disassociate themselves from their (3)      lie          .

<e.g.> “Absolutely no party took place at this house.”    “I didn’t host a party here.”

 

<II. Liars tend to be more (4)    negative     >

Because on a subconscious level, they feel (5)     others            about lying.

<e.g.> “Sorry, my stupid phone battery died. I hate that thing.”

 

<III. Liars tend to explain events in (6)    simple terms           .>

Our brains struggle to build a complex lie. (7)     Judgement           and

(8)   evaluation         are complex things for our brains to compute.

<e.g.> “I did not have sexual relations with that woman.”

 

<IV. Liars tend to use (9)     longer       and more convoluted sentence structure.>

Insert (10)    unnecessary         words and irrelevant but factual sounding details in order to pad the lie.

<e.g.> “I can say, categorically, that this investigation indicates that no one on the White House staff, no one in this administration presently employed was involved in this very bizarre incident.”

 

 

6. In this speech, the speaker compares two interviews with Lance Armstrong, conducted in 2005 and 2013. How are they different?
He used more personal pronouns in the latter interview.

 

 

7. At the end of the speech, the speaker mentions that we do not have to be extremely sensitive about lies we encounter on a daily basis. Why?
Because many of them are far less serious than the examples which were introduced in the speech, and they may even be harmless. 

 

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